Pat Ferrick in his windup

Stars Who Are Over 60

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

When the Central North Carolina Men’s Baseball League decided to start a 60+ age division, they knew that the crazies that are still playing baseball at that age are special.

It got me thinking about what major leaguers are available for a 60+ division?

Born in 1963 and just making the age cutoff would include.

  • Dante Bichette was born on Monday, November 18, 1963, in West Palm Beach, Florida. Bichette was 24 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 5, 1988.
  • David Cone was born on Wednesday, January 2, 1963, in Kansas City, Missouri. Cone was 23 years old when he broke into the big leagues on June 8, 1986, with the Kansas City Royals.
  • Lenny Dykstra was born on Sunday, February 10, 1963, in Santa Ana, California. Dykstra was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 3, 1985, with the New York Mets.
  • Cecil Fielder was born on Saturday, September 21, 1963, in Los Angeles, California. Fielder was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on July 20, 1985, with the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • Hall of Famer Randy Johnson was born on Tuesday, September 10, 1963, in Walnut Creek, California. Johnson was 25 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 15, 1988, with the Montreal Expos.
  • Hall of Famer Edgar Martinez was born on Wednesday, January 2, 1963, in New York, New York. Martinez was 24 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 12, 1987, with the Seattle Mariners.
  • New Hall of Famer Fred McGriff was born on Thursday, October 31, 1963, in Tampa, Florida. McGriff was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 17, 1986, with the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • Mark McGwire was born on Tuesday, October 1, 1963, in Pomona, California. McGwire was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on August 22, 1986, with the Oakland Athletics.
  • Paul O’Neill was born on Monday, February 25, 1963, in Columbus, Ohio. O’Neill was 22 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 3, 1985, with the Cincinnati Reds.
  • David Wells was born on Monday, May 20, 1963, in Torrance, California. Wells was 24 years old when he broke into the big leagues on June 30, 1987, with the Toronto Blue Jays.

If you need to round out your team, you can also choose from a few slightly older guys.

  • Roger Clemens was born on Saturday, August 4, 1962, in Dayton, Ohio. Clemens was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 15, 1984, with the Boston Red Sox.
  • Eric Davis was born on Tuesday, May 29, 1962, in Los Angeles, California. Davis was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 19, 1984, with the Cincinnati Reds.
  • Don Mattingly was born on Thursday, April 20, 1961, in Evansville, Indiana. Mattingly was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on September 8, 1982, with the New York Yankees.
  • Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr. was born on Wednesday, August 24, 1960, in Havre De Grace, Maryland. Ripken, Jr. was 20 years old when he broke into the big leagues on August 10, 1981, with the Baltimore Orioles.
  • Darryl Strawberry was born on Monday, March 12, 1962, in Los Angeles, California. Strawberry was 21 years old when he broke into the big leagues on May 6, 1983, with the New York Mets.

That means we would have a pretty sweet team. But we need a second baseman and catcher… who do we add?

Over 60 MLB Dream Team
Over 60 MLB Dream Team
Satchel Paige

Interracial Baseball from 1920-1935

Estimated reading time: 31 minutes

As Satchel Paige stood behind the pitcher’s mound facing the outfield, his mind likely raced with excitement and a sense of accomplishment. With two outs in the ninth inning, the African American hurler and his Bismarck (North Dakota) teammates were on the brink of the first-ever national semi-pro baseball championship.

Continue reading “Interracial Baseball from 1920-1935”
Kevin Youkilis of the Chicago White Sox

Avoiding Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke

Estimated reading time: 7 minutes

It’s no shock that you get hot and sweaty playing baseball in North Carolina during the summer. As Kyle Davis wrote about feeling for baseball players playing the game during the heat, “…they do it while wearing like, full-length pants. In uniforms made out of polyester, and dark hats made of wool covering their heads. MLB players walk around in sweltering, unforgiving heat, basically wearing a heavy sun and warmth absorption costume. And they still run around and swing bats and throw baseballs just fine. They stand out in the middle of a grass and dirt field with literally nowhere else to go and no escape. They just have to stay there, flesh afire. It makes no effing sense!

Continue reading “Avoiding Heat Exhaustion & Heat Stroke”

Some Amazing Baseball Statistics

Estimated reading time: 12 minutes

While looking through the statistics at Baseball-Reference, I noticed something that I wouldn’t call surprising, but a bit overwhelming. It seems that baseball’s best players peak in their late 20’s. Pitchers, batters, fielders, it doesn’t matter – at 27ish, they’re as good as they’re going to get. Why is that?

Continue reading “Some Amazing Baseball Statistics”
MIke Trout pitching in high school 2008

5 Major Leaguers Too Young For Our League

Estimated reading time: 4 minutes

The CNCMSBL attracts guys of all ages. Our 18+ division has its share of 18 year-olds and our 50+ division has guys in their 70’s. Almost all of us have one thing in common, we’ve loved the game since we were kids.

There are some guys who were so good that they were ready to break into the major league even before they were old enough to vote!

Continue reading “5 Major Leaguers Too Young For Our League”

Better Coaching For The Win

Estimated reading time: 2 minutes

In the Central North Carolina Men’s Senior Baseball League, there are a lot of very good players. From 18 to 80 there are guys that will make you stand up and take notice of their great play, but what about the rest of us?

Most of us are pretty good players but we’re still trying to get better. We could all use some good coaching, but great coaches are more of a rarity than great players. There are 333 plaques in the National Baseball Hall of Fame, and only 22 of them are managers.

Continue reading “Better Coaching For The Win”
fenway scoreboard

What’s Your 2 Strike Approach to Hitting?

Estimated reading time: 5 minutes

This article was originally published by Garrett Gordon on the BaseballRebellion Premium section (membership required). BaseballRebellion is a big supporter of the CNCMSBL and if you’re looking to get better, you should be talking with them.

“Widen Your Stance!” “Move Up!” “Move Back!” “Choke Up!” “Stay Late!”

Do you hear these coaching cues during games? More than likely when your son or daughter has two strikes these are the things yelled to them. Yes, they are common. But are they correct?

Continue reading “What’s Your 2 Strike Approach to Hitting?”

Ash vs Maple vs Birch Wood Baseball Bats

Estimated reading time: 8 minutes

Back in 1965, your choice for baseball bats was fairly straight-forward. Did you prefer the Louisville Slugger like Mickey Mantle used or the Adirondack like Willie Mays. Both were made from select ash. Professional baseball was dominated by a few big bat companies.

At the turn of the 21st century, Barry Bonds home run exploits put the spotlight on the bat he was using, and his bat was made out of maple.

Birch, which is more flexible like ash and dense like maple, is starting to be picked up by a growing number of big leaguers. Birch recently passed ash as the number two type of bat in major league baseball.

Continue reading “Ash vs Maple vs Birch Wood Baseball Bats”

Baseball Hall of Fame in Fayetteville

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Starting on Friday, March 22, and running through May 11, Picturing America’s Pastime will feature 51 framed photographs representing the Baseball Hall of Fame’s collection of approximately a quarter million images at the Fayetteville Art Council located at 301 Hay Street [map]. As an extension of the Museum’s exhibit in Cooperstown, the touring version of Picturing America’s Pastime captures the essence of an exhibit designed to show the historic link between the two American passions – baseball and photography.

Continue reading “Baseball Hall of Fame in Fayetteville”

Should Your Team Be Shifting More?

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

Baseball teams have been shifting defensively forever. Most of us think of the modern idea of a defensive infield shift started with Lou Boudreau and what became known as the “William’s Shift” in 1946.

This photo diagram shows the positions of the Cleveland infield and outfield in the so-called “Cleveland Shift” defense against Ted Williams of the Boston Red Sox during the game in Boston. This photo was made after Williams had found a chink in the defense and slapped one to the left for a single.

The first time Williams came up against this shift, he hit the ball right to Boudreau himself, standing directly between first and second base.

From that moment on, teams shifted on Williams for the rest of his career. The shift was so common that Williams once estimated it lopped about 15 points off of his lifetime batting average, and he wasn’t far off: his career splits before and after that season showed a difference of 16 points.

Continue reading “Should Your Team Be Shifting More?”